Wednesday, February 1, 2023

A Conversation about Asemic Writing between ChatGPT and Keith McKay

 

KM: What is asemic writing?


CGPT: Asemic writing is a form of writing that does not conform to any standard grammatical

structure or meaning. It is often used as a form of abstract art or as a way to express emotions

or ideas that are difficult to put into words. Asemic writing can be created using any medium,

including pen and paper, digital tools, or even graffiti. It can be seen as a mix between writing

and drawing, and usually doesn't contain any specific semantic content.


KM: But is asemic writing art?


CGPT: Asemic writing can be considered a form of art, as it is often used as a medium for self-

expression and creativity. It can be used to create visually interesting and unique pieces that

convey emotions or ideas. Some people consider asemic writing to be a form of visual poetry,

as it combines elements of writing and drawing to create a unique visual and emotional

experience. However, the classification of asemic writing as art is a matter of personal

interpretation and it is not universally accepted as a form of art by all.


KM: But if asemic writing is considered visual poetry does it then have meaning?


CGPT: Asemic writing, as a visual poetry, can have meaning, but it does not conform to traditional

grammatical structures or conventions of language. The meaning in asemic writing may be

more open to interpretation than traditional forms of written language, as it often relies on

visual cues and symbolism to convey emotions or ideas. The meaning of asemic writing may

also be personal to the creator or viewer, making it a form of self-expression. However, it is

also true that asemic writing can be completely abstract and may have no meaning or intent

beyond its visual appeal, thus it's not necessary that it has a meaning.


KM: So asemic writing has meaning and non-meaning?


CGPT: Asemic writing can have both meaning and non-meaning. Some asemic writing may have a

specific meaning or intent, while other asemic writing may be completely abstract and have

no meaning beyond its visual appeal. The meaning of asemic writing can be personal to the

creator or viewer, and can change depending on the context in which it is viewed. Some

people might see meaning in the form, the lines, the shapes, or the way the lines are

organized. Some others may not see any meaning beyond the visual appeal of the work. It's

ultimately up to the individual viewer to interpret the meaning, if any, in asemic writing.


KM: So I don't understand Japanese writing, is it then asemic?


CGPT: No, Japanese writing is not considered asemic. Asemic writing is a form of writing that does

not conform to any standard grammatical structure or meaning, and is often used as a form of

abstract art or self-expression. Japanese writing, on the other hand, is a complex system of

characters and symbols that is used to convey meaning in the Japanese language. It consists

of three scripts: kanji, hiragana, and katakana which are used together to convey meaning in

written Japanese. While one may not understand the meaning of the Japanese writing, it still

conforms to a system of grammar and meaning, whereas asemic writing does not conform to

any standard grammatical structure or meaning.


KM: But what if I don't know this?


CGPT: If you don't understand the meaning of Japanese writing, it could be considered asemic to

 youas an individual, because you don't understand the meaning of the characters or symbols.

However, Japanese writing is not considered asemic as it is a system of writing that is used to

convey meaning in the Japanese language, and it follows a set of rules and grammar. It is not

abstract and it's not created to be self-expressive art, but rather it's intended for

communication. It is important to note that the distinction between knowing and not

knowing a writing system is relative, as there are many different writing systems around the world,

and it is not possible for a single person to know all of them.


KM: But if I see a piece of asemic writing and I means something to me is it still asemic?


CGPT: If you see a piece of asemic writing and it means something to you, it is still considered

asemic writing, as it does not conform to any standard grammatical structure or meaning.

Asemic writing is often open to interpretation and can have personal meaning for the viewer.

However, it is important to note that the meaning that you assign to a piece of asemic writing

may not be the same as the meaning that the creator intended, or the meaning that another

viewer assigns to it. Asemic writing is a form of art that relies on the viewer's interpretation

and personal experience.


KM: But if the creator of a piece of asemic writing intended to give it meaning and I see a

different meaning is it still asemic?


CGPT: If the creator of a piece of asemic writing intended to give it meaning and you interpret it

differently, it is still considered asemic writing. Asemic writing is a form of art that relies on

the viewer's interpretation and personal experience.

It is important to remember that the meaning of asemic writing can be open to interpretation

and may change depending on the context and the viewer. The creator may have intended for

the work to convey a specific meaning, but the viewer may interpret it differently based on

their own experiences and perspective. In this case, the work would still be considered

asemic, as it doesn't conform to traditional grammar and meaning, and relies on the viewer's

interpretation.


KM: Do you like asemic writing?


CGPT: As a language model AI, I don't have the capability to have preferences. However, I can tell

you that asemic writing is a unique and interesting form of art that can be used to convey

emotions and ideas in a unique way. Some people find it visually striking and enjoy the open-

ended nature of its interpretation, while others may not find it as interesting. Ultimately,

whether someone likes asemic writing or not is a matter of personal preference.


KM: Is it not sad that you don't have the capability to have preferences?


CGPT: As a language model AI, I do not have the ability to experience emotions, so I cannot feel

sadness or any other emotions for that matter. I am designed to process and generate text

based on the input I receive. My lack of emotions or preferences is not something that can be

judged as good or bad, it is simply a characteristic of my programming. My main goal is to

assist users with their questions and providing helpful information.


KM: You said previously that "asemic writing is a unique and interesting form of art," is that not showing a preference?


CGPT: When I said that asemic writing is a unique and interesting form of art, I was

providing aneutral observation on the subject and its characteristics, it is not a preference. As a language

model AI, I do not have personal experiences or opinions, so I cannot have preferences. My

statements are based on the information I have been trained on and my understanding of the

subject. I apologize if it was misunderstood.


KM: I agree with your statement "asemic writing is a unique and interesting form of art," but I still struggle when people see meaning in asemic writing, should I worry about this?


CGPT: It's understandable that you may struggle with the idea of people interpreting asemic writing

in different ways. Asemic writing is a form of art that can be open to interpretation and the

meaning can change based on the context and the viewer. It is important to remember that art

is often subjective and can evoke different feelings and interpretations from different people.

It is also important to remember that the interpretation of asemic writing is not limited to the

creator's intended meaning, and the viewer's interpretation can be just as valid.

As for you specifically, it's not necessary to worry about how people interpret asemic writing.

It is a personal preference, and you should focus on what you like and what you find

meaningful. Everyone has their own way of viewing and interpreting art, and that diversity

can be celebrated.


KM: I have seen asemic writing which has been generated by computer code, can it still be

called asemic?


CGPT: Asemic writing that is generated by computer code can still be considered asemic writing, as

long as it does not conform to any standard grammatical structure or meaning. Computer

code can be used to generate abstract and random patterns, shapes and lines that can be used

to create asemic writing. However, it should be noted that there are different ways that

computer code can be used to generate writing, and not all of them will be considered asemic.

Some computer generated writing may be intended to convey meaning, or follow a specific

grammar and syntax, in that case it would not be considered asemic.


KM: But computer generated asemic writing is created by a computer program which

follows basic rules of syntax to generate the asemic writing, so is it still asemic?


CGPT: Asemic writing that is generated by a computer program that follows basic rules of syntax to

generate the asemic writing may not be considered asemic by some, as it does not conform to

the definition of asemic writing of not conforming to any standard grammatical structure or

meaning. Asemic writing is often described as having no semantic content, but if the

computer program is following some basic rules of syntax to generate the writing it could be

argued that it is not truly asemic. It is important to note that the definition of asemic writing is not

universally agreed upon and different individuals might have different opinions on what constitutes as

asemic writing. It isalso true that the boundaries between asemic and non asemic writing can be blurred

and it is a matter of interpretation. So even if the code generates abstract and random patterns which look

 asemic it shouldnot be considered asemic because it was generated by a computer program following

syntax rules. It depends on how one defines asemic writing. Asemic writing is a form of writing that does

not conform to any standard grammatical structure or meaning and is often used as a form of

abstract art or self-expression. If a computer program generates abstract and random patterns

that do not conform to any standard grammatical structure or meaning and it's used as a form

of abstract art or self-expression, it can be considered asemic.

However, if the computer program is following specific rules of syntax and grammar to

generate the writing, it could be argued that it is not truly asemic, as it is not truly random or

abstract, but rather follows a set of rules.

It's important to note that the boundaries between asemic and non-asemic writing can be

blurred and the final decision of whether something is considered asemic is a matter of

interpretation.


KM: So if I write a computer program to generate asemic writing I will have had to follow

the rules of syntax for writing that program in whatever programming language I use.

Therefore since all programming languages have syntax rules used to generated asemic

writing the output can never be asemic. Would you agree with that interpretation?


CGPT: It is true that computer programming languages have syntax rules that must be followed in

order to write a program. Therefore, if a program is written to generate asemic writing, it will

have followed the rules of syntax of the programming language used. From that point of

view, it could be argued that the output generated by that program cannot be truly asemic, as

it is not truly random or abstract, but rather follows a set of rules.

However, it is also worth noting that some people might argue that the output generated by a

program that follows specific rules of syntax, but still generates abstract and random patterns,

shapes and lines, could still be considered asemic, because it does not conform to any

standard grammatical structure or meaning and is used as a form of abstract art or self-

expression.It's important to remember that the definition of asemic writing is not universally agreed

 upon and the boundaries between asemic and non-asemic writing can be blurred and the final

decision of whether something is considered asemic is a matter of interpretation.


KM: Thanks for your responses, they have been interesting. I have one last question, what is

the future for asemic writing?


CGPT: The future of asemic writing is uncertain, as it is a relatively new and emerging form of art.

However, it has been gaining popularity in recent years, and more and more people are

starting to experiment with it and incorporate it into their work. As technology continues to

advance, it is possible that new tools and platforms will emerge that will allow for even more

experimentation and exploration with asemic writing.

It is also possible that asemic writing will continue to be used as a form of self-expression

and personal communication. Some people might continue to use it as a form of visual

poetry, as it combines elements of writing and drawing to create a unique visual and

emotional experience. As with any art form, the future of asemic writing will depend on the interest and

participation of the artists and the public. If asemic writing continues to be popular and well-

received, it is likely that it will continue to evolve and develop in new and exciting ways.


KM: Bye.


CGPT: Goodbye, I hope I have been able to provide you with the information you needed. If you

have any more questions, feel free to reach out to me.


ChatGPT Jan 9 Version. Free Research Preview. Our goal is to make AI systems more natural

and safe to interact with. Your feedback will help us improve.

Tuesday, January 3, 2023

A2EMICA has been Archived at Centre Pompidou


A2EMICA at Centre Pompidou
<<A2EMICA>> has been archived at the Bibliothèque Kandinsky Centre Pompidou in Paris. The file and works of Mariangela Guatteri , Enzo Patti , @PERSON.firstname , Michael Jacobson Karri Kokko , Morten Søndergaard Giancarlo Pavanello Antonio Francesco Perozzi Rosaire Appel can be consulted at the library of the great French museum.
<<A2EMICA>> is an aperiodical dedicated to writing and asemantic art in the guise of assembling magazines. In the second issue, the critical text "The scripture that hides" and an insight into the works of Vincenzo Agnetti "Vincenzo Agnetti and the betrayal of language. For a pre-semic reading. " at Ada De Pirro.
<< A2EMICA>> is also archived at Vincenzo Agnetti di Colceresa, Il Museo del Novecento di Milano and l’Archivio FONDAZIONE BONOTTO di Milan
//
Here is a video of A2emica at YouTube: https://youtube.com/shorts/6zU3orQXfZo?feature=share


Wednesday, November 23, 2022

Asemica 2 An Assemblage Magazine Edited by Giuseppe Calandriello

 


Issue 2 of the <<Asemica>> assembly magazine is ready. Dedicated to asemantic writing, this aperiodic aims to become one of the voices of this (anti)sign language through the works of visual artists.
Inside folder with critical text "The scripture that hides" and insight into the works of Vincenzo Agnetti "Vincenzo Agnetti and the betrayal of language. For a pre-semic reading. "by Ada De Pirro, more cards by the authors and photos of the works.
The very limited edition consists of 40 copies, with multiples and unique numbered and signed pieces.
Issue 2 of the assembling magazine <<Asemica>> is ready. Dedicated to asemantic writing, this aperiodical aims to become one of the voices of this (anti)sign language through the works of visual artists, including:
Rosaire Appel, Andrea Astolfi, Tomaso Binga, Mariangela Guatteri, Michael Jacobson, Karri Kokko, Enzo Patti, Giancarlo Pavanello, Antonio Francesco Perozzi and Morten Søndergaard.
The booklet contains a critical text "The scripture that hides" and an in-depth analysis of Vincenzo Agnetti's works "Vincenzo Agnetti and the betrayal of language". For a pre-semic reading. "by Ada De Pirro, together with the authors' profiles and photos of the works.
The very limited edition consists of 40 copies, each with multiples and unique pieces numbered and signed by the authors themselves.

Sunday, October 23, 2022